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Category Archives: interior design

Autodesk will soon release Revit 2011 coming up in a couple weeks. After last years’ release of Revit 2010, I think people are ready for refinement.  For most, it took most of the year to get used to the new ribbon UI — and this year will bring that level of refinement that Revit needs.  Revit should finally become easier to use, more intuitive, and implement a lot of fixes for reported bugs & annoyances.

Out of the list, my favorites are the changes made to the ribbon UI. Many people will be glad to hear that the modify tab can be static now and the contextual tab will have the ability to return to the previous tab when done. Also they’ve included a QAT or Quick Access Toolbar that will give the user an option to “create their own” toolbar. These enhancements will greatly reduce confusion for new users.

Other essentials (read: wish list items) that were included in this release are backgrounds for renderings, a more realistic view for panning around in 3D, text enhancements, tagging items in linked models… a lot of these will help our workflow out immensely!

As I’m sure most of you are here for the details (and not my opinion), alas, here they are:

  • Improvements to DWG Export, increased visual fidelity, text treatment
  • Improvements 3D display quality & new types of views (ambient occlusion, realistic, consistent colors views)
  • View open time reduced
  • New Guide Grids (alignment grids) for sheets to help with view alignment
  • Align in 3D
  • New keyboard shortcut editing dialog box
  • New abilities around linked files, ability to tag an object in a linked file
  • Quicker file open times, now multi-threaded
  • Repeat last command (enter or right-click menu)
  • New Autodesk Material Library 2011
  • Materials displayed more consistently across views and platforms
  • New Placeholder sheets, ability to change placeholder to actual sheet
  • Ability to add/crop background image for rendering
  • Text enhancements
  • Find/Replace
  • Options for exporting text to CAD to maintain visual or functional fidelity
  • Box around text note
  • Distance between leader and text
  • Bullets & Numbering now possible
  • Additional dialog boxes now resizeable
  • Ability to create custom elevation tags
  • New sun path feature added
  • Ability to control temp dimension appearance (without editing Revit.ini)
  • Revit MEP copy/monitor fixtures
  • Ability to disable the auto-switch to contextual tab when object is selected so you can keep current tab active.
  • Ability to return to previous tab after action completion
  • New Properties Palette
  • Modify tab is both static & contextual now, remains in same location
  • New Customizable QAT (Quick-Access Toolbar) to add your most-used tools
  • New workset & design option controls added to the bottom-right of Revit window
  • Workset visiblity enhancements

That’s it for now! As always bookmark revit2011.info for the latest on Revit 2011.

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This should be an excellent webcast for interior designers in Revit.  I know interior designers are always hesitant to use Revit on smaller TI projects, well here’s the chance to see how to do it!  (or at least how Autodesk  does it).  Whether you know how to use design options or not, I think what will be most interesting is how they explain the workflow and moving back and forth between Revit & 3ds.  Anyhow, enjoy!

From:  Autodesk | Building Media Center

The Magic Revealed: Design Options and Updates in Revit Architecture and 3ds Max Design

Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 10:00 am

Get an insider’s view of how Autodesk® Revit® Architecture and Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design work together so that design options can be created and managed without creating separate models. In this session, Amy Fietkau and Eddie Perlberg, AEC Technical Specialists for Architecture and Design Visualizaiton, will show a Tenant Improvement project where they are renovating the interior and need to evaluate some design iterations. They will show how the design options are developed and refined in Revit. When high end renderings are needed to sell the client on the designs, they show how 3ds Max Design is used to manage the design options within the same Revit model. See the magic of Design Options and Updates revealed, and learn:

  • How design iterations are developed and managed in Revit Architecture using a single model
  • How to manage these same design options in 3ds Max Design using a single file
  • Experience a new way of developing designs for sharing and selling to clients

From Arcom MasterSPEC MasterFormat ’04

SECTION 01 42 00 – REFERENCES
PART 1 – GENERAL
1.1 DEFINITIONS

A.     “Approved“:  When used to convey Architect’s action on Contractor’s submittals, applications, and requests, “approved” is limited to Architect’s duties and responsibilities as stated in the Conditions of the Contract.
B.     “Directed“:  A command or instruction by Architect.  Other terms including “requested,” “authorized,” “selected,” “approved,” “required,” and “permitted” have the same meaning as “directed.”
C.     “Indicated“:  Requirements expressed by graphic representations or in written form on Drawings, in Specifications, and in other Contract Documents.  Other terms including “shown,” “noted,” “scheduled,” and “specified” have the same meaning as “indicated.”
D.     “Regulations“:  Laws, ordinances, statutes, and lawful orders issued by authorities having jurisdiction, and rules, conventions, and agreements within the construction industry that control performance of the Work.
E.     “Furnish“:  Supply and deliver to Project site, ready for unloading, unpacking, assembly, installation, and similar operations.
F.     “Install“:  Operations at Project site including unloading, temporarily storing, unpacking, assembling, erecting, placing, anchoring, applying, working to dimension, finishing, curing, protecting, cleaning, and similar operations.
G.     “Provide“:  Furnish and install, complete and ready for the intended use.
H.     “Installer“:  Contractor or another entity engaged by Contractor as an employee, Subcontractor, or Sub-subcontractor, to perform a particular construction operation, including installation, erection, application, and similar operations.  Installers shall be experienced in the operation they are engaged to perform.
1.  Using a term such as “carpentry” does not imply that certain construction activities must be performed by accredited or unionized individuals of a corresponding generic name, such as “carpenter.”  It also does not imply that requirements specified apply exclusively to tradespeople of the corresponding generic name.
I.     “Project Site“:  Space available for performing construction activities.  The extent of Project site is shown on Drawings and may or may not be identical with the description of the land on which Project is to be built.
J.     “As Required“:  As required by regulatory bodies, by referenced standards, by existing conditions, by generally accepted construction practice or by the Contract Documents.  In the event of ambiguity or conflicts, the most stringent requirements shall apply.
K.     “By Others” refers to work that is not a part of the Contract.
L.     “N.I.C.:  “Not in Contract” means the work or the item indicated is not a part of the Contract and will be provided by the Owner.

This truly is ideal, the best of digital home meets the best of green living…

Panasonic (Eco&Ud) House Website
http://panasonic.co.jp/euhouse/en/index.html

Video after the jump:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IXLXuhXUVI

Eco home of the future built by Panasonic

The Eco & UD House at Panasonic’s technology showcase in Tokyo is a prototype of a home the company said could start being built by 2010. Using the appliances displayed there, a typical family of four could reduce its carbon dioxide emissions, and knock heating bills down some 60 percent, according to the company.

The Genkiyoku bathtub, for instance, is an upscale spa-tub that emits thousands of microbubbles (with a 30 percent oxygen content) for relaxation. The tub, however, also contains layers of a highly efficient type of insulation that can keep the bathtub warm for six hours.

A heating system converts natural gas to hydrogen. Electrons stripped from the hydrogen go to heat the home. Meanwhile, the heat generated by the chemical reactions needed to produce the electrons heat the water used in the home.

Around the corner in the kitchen and laundry rooms, motorized dish racks rise out of countertops while clothes racks descend from the ceiling. Both devices actually consume more electricity than plain, unmotorized dish racks found at Ikea. Economizing space, however, arguably gives the home the sensation of more space and marginally cuts down on its overall footprint, which can have an environmental benefit.

And let’s not forget the EMIT Suimin sleep system, which dims lights, lowers the upward tilt on the bed and plays soothing images on a plasma TV to induce slumber. Or the soundproofed home theater next to the kid’s bedroom.

http://www.cnettv.com/9710-1_53-27683.html (Video)

http://news.com.com/Eco+house+of+the+future…/_3-6129160.html (Article)

This has to be one of my favorite green products as it goes back to a project I had my first year of design school in fundamentals, to design a cardboard chair. Well here’s a better take at it…


Paper softseating is made entirely from kraft paper, utilizing a flexible honeycomb structure to fan open into stools, benches and loungers. Each of the sizes and types of softseating can compress like a big book for storage. The seating is available in natural, unbleached brown kraft paper and kraft paper that has been dyed a deep black with bamboo charcoal ink to emphasize the geometric pattern of light and shadow. Paper softseating can be used creatively and interchangeably as seating or low tables, and the elements can be stacked playfully as building blocks.Paper softseating is not intended to be disposable or thought of for short-term use. According to the manufacturer, the paper actually improves with age, as the surface texture of the paper edges softens with use over time into a pleasing natural patina. When one sits on the paper stools or loungers, the edges of the paper will gently soften and crush, creating irregular facets that catch the light and form a unique organic pattern within the crisp honeycomb geometry of the structure. As the surface of the paper softens, the stools and loungers maintain their structural integrity, because the honeycomb geometry lends the paper strength and enables this economy of material resources. Paper softseating is flame-retardant treated and 100% recyclable. [via Molo.]

video demonstration of paper softseating may be viewed here:
http://www.glumbert.com/media/foldingchair

product link:
http://www.molodesign.com/pages.php?section=products&view_product_id=40

Newly released lighting product Evoke by Amerlux Lighting Solutions is a new “green” alternative to the traditional MR16 halogens. Designed by Gensler, a sustainable design leader, the Evoke comes in a 2.9″ downlight in both round and square lenses with numerous different trims avaialable. With the use of metal halide and at only 20 watts (using MM/CDM-Tm, ES16, T4GU6.5, CMHMR16, or PAR20MH lamps) the downlights help conserve energy and prolong the life of the bulbs. A great alternative to the halogen MR16’s if you are looking for a way to decrease energy and help you attain your sustainable design goals for your project.

Product Link:
http://www.amerlux.com/pages/143_evoke_product.cfm