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Well just like previous years, it looks like early-mid April seems to be the rollout of Autodesk’s new products.  Below is this years rollout schedule for the AEC products, I’ve included them below:

Architecture, Engineering & Construction Products   Release Date
AutoCAD® Architecture 2011   March 25
AutoCAD® MEP 2011   March 25
AutoCAD® Map 3D 2011   March 29
Autodesk® Navisworks® Freedom 2011   April 2
Autodesk® Navisworks® Manage 2011   April 2
Autodesk® Navisworks® Simulate 2011   April 2
AutoCAD® Revit® Architecture Suite 2011   April 8
AutoCAD® Revit® MEP Suite 2011   April 8
AutoCAD® Revit® Structure Suite 2011   April 8
AutoCAD® Structural Detailing 2011   April 8
Autodesk® Revit® Structure 2011   April 8
Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2011   April 8
Autodesk® Robot™ Structural Analysis 2011   April 12
Autodesk® Buzzsaw®   April 17
AutoCAD® Civil 3D® 2011   April 20
Autodesk® Ecotect® Analysis   April 20
Autodesk® Constructware®   April 24
     
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Searching the internet for good quality Revit content can take some time.  Fortunately I’ve come across a couple good quality sites that may interest you in your hunt for quality content.  The sites I’m listing here are not the only options out there for content, but they each have a very different approach to content and may cater to your content creation philosophy.  The content ranges from groups, fill patterns, families, models, rendering materials, etc.


Autodesk Seek

http://seek.autodesk.com/

There’s no better place to find content other than the source.  Most of the content found on Autodesk’s website is directly from manufacturer’s and are, to some degree, modeled to the Autodesk family standard.  Be careful though as some of these models are overly detailed.  But probably one of the best places to start for Revit content.

Autodesk Seek

Autodesk Seek



Little Details Count (paid)

http://www.littledetailscount.com/

Little Details Count is a website focused clearly on one thing, highly detailed & render-able Revit families and models.  While this approach sounds ideal, it’s really not that great for large commercial projects, because of the larger file size and increased polygon count for rendering.  What this IS ideal for are those residential projects that are smaller in scale and affords you more time to put into the details.  The only other issue I have is most of the content that is on the website right now, well it’s fluff.  It’s pots & pans and paper towels & teapots.  It’s the fluff you use for renderings, the problem being, if you want a good quality rendering, chances are you aren’t going to do it in Revit.  Autodesk never really intended Revit rendering for that purpose, hence the crippled Mental Ray.  What Revit rendering IS good for is design charette type renderings, where you want to study lighting or massing, or preliminary renderings before exporting to 3ds max and THEN adding fluff.  So I’m digressing a bit, but all this aside, these are really great families.  They’re considerably inexpensive and very well built.  So if you’re building a small casino, or building a residential project in Revit and doing a lot of final renderings in Revit, these are the families for you.

Little Details That Count

Little Details Count - "Highly Detailed Revit Families & Models"


Revit Content All-in-One (paid)

http://revit-content.com/

Revit Content has a slightly different approach. Most of their content revolves around making the family as flexible as possible. I can appreciate this approach as it makes for a very efficient family (and you know it’s well built if it’s that flexible). A huge plus. But this is one of many benefits. First, you can easily update a lot of content. Second, you have a smaller more condense Revit family library. Third, your project files are greatly reduced in size. There are huge benefits to this approach.

From their website it seems that they have a very diverse and full content library to choose from, I’d imagine the content is relatively affordable considering all the flexibility you get in “built-in”. And lastly they have a very unique “content update notifier” allowing customers to know when a newer version of the family comes out. A very professional and well thought out approach to quality Revit content creation.

Revit Content

Revit Content - "Just Professional Revit Families"


RevitCity (free)

http://www.revitcity.com/downloads.php

If you ask most people new to Revit where they get their content if they don’t find it in the default Autodesk library, there’s a good chance the first words out of their mouth are, “Revit City”. This is good and bad. First the good, the database they have includes over 8,000 Revit families, all of them searchable & sortable by division, and best of all, they are all FREE. Now for the bad. There’s no quality control. No quality control means you have no way of knowing how well built the family is. Sure they have a rating system, but most people rating the families are rating them based on how they “look” or how “detailed” they are. That doesn’t always equate to quality. Is it flexible? Does it have any parameters built-in? Is the file-size appropriate? Are the materials set up for rendering? All questions you should ask when looking for good content. And yes there are GOOD Revit families and models to be found here. It just may require some hunting.

Revit City

Revit City


Contact your Local Reseller

http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/partner/search?id=1088201&siteID=123112

Most if not all vendors for Revit liklely have the capability (for a price) to create custom content for your firm or for your project.  So if you can’t find the content you need out there, don’t have enough time to do it yourself, or aren’t sure how to create content — it may be a good idea to “contact your local reseller” 🙂

Contact your Local Reseller

Contact your Local Reseller


Lastly I’d like to state, that while I know 3D Warehouse by Google is very popular for SketchUp, there are a couple caveats to using these models in Revit.  First, these models are made for sketchup, not Revit, and in the process of converting any third-party file format into Revit, you should be wary of the data coming with it.  These files can be very high in polygon count, they do not carry any parametric data with them, and there’s virtually no flexibility with these models.  With data like this, if it’s not encapsulated inside a generic family before importing into Revit, it can cause serious errors in your Revit file causing hard-crashes.  All reasons you’re much better off building the Revit family from scratch.

  1. Bluetooth Headset – In terms of hands-free headsets, there are really only two brand options here.  The BlueAnt Q1 and the JawBone PRIME.  Both products are light years ahead of their competition in terms of fit, weight, and most importantly sound quality with their cutting edge noise-reduction technology.  Of course they also will set you back the most, but headsets are well worth it.
  2. Headphones – Sure you can use your headset to listen to music, but unless you are deaf in one ear, or like to listen to music in monotone, you’d be better off buying a good set of headphones.  This is a highly subjective category as some people are audiophiles and others are casual listeners.  For the casual listeners on a budget I’d propose the V-MODA Bass Freq (earbuds<$30), the JBuds J3 Micro Atomics (earbuds <$30).  For those audiophiles that have the cash, the UltimateEars SuperFi or Shure SE530 are your best bets.
  3. Dock/Cradle – For the best bang for your buck, the Motorola Multimedia Station is the clear winner here.  For ~$40 you can get an integrated solution that has it’s own built-in app into the DROID along with another wall fast-rate charger.  The only downside?  No speaker integration, but that can be fixed with adding a 3.5mm headphone cable to your speakers or amplifier.
  4. Travel/Car Charger – if you buy the car mount kit, you’ll get a car charger with that and if you buy the multimedia station you’ll get a wall charger with that, so really the wall adapter and USB power/data cable that came with your phone is the ideal travel charger.  But if you don’t get either, you can get a car charger standalone here and an extra wall charger here.
  5. Case – Cases are about as subjective as wardrobes are.  There are leopard print back cover shields, plaid back cover shields, or if you’re sane (like me) there are clear protective cases like the Zagg InvisibleSHIELD.  Not only does the invisibleSHIELD come with a lifetime warranty, scratch-proof military grade .2 mm plastic, but because it’s so thin, this protective covering you can keep on and it will fit in your dock, something you CAN’T do with back covers or thicker cases, keep that in mind.
  6. Extra Battery – Don’t take any chances here — your best bet is to buy an OEM (original manufacturer’s equipment) battery like the Motorola BP6X battery that was designed specifically for your phone.  Not only will it last longer and give you the best power rating, but it won’t damage your device, like some of the cheap knockoffs can.
  7. Chargers & Cables – The DROID comes with an excellent 2-in-1 USB cable that has the ability to power and send data, but if you need an extra data cable, I’d recommend this microUSB cable and Power-to-USB cable from Monoprice.  If you have the multi-media dock, you should be able to use your USB cable that came with your phone as your extra.  For fast-rate charging, there’s nothing better than the cable that is provided by default.
  8. Car Kit / GPS Mount – Another Motorola winner here is the Motorola Car Mount with a magnet built-in, once you put your phone in the mount, it will automatically launch Google’s Navigation app.  As a nice addition, the mount comes with it’s own fast-rate car charger, so you don’t have to buy an extra.
  9. Memory Card – For carrying all your music & movies with you, the standard 16GB micro SDHC card might not be enough.  I’d recommend picking up an extra along with a USB reader like the Kingston 16GB micro SDHC w/ USB reader.
  10. Software – Lastly and probably most importantly, don’t forget the Motorola Media Link software to upload your photos, music and videos.  The software will let you sync certain folders, or playlists created in Windows Media Player or iTunes.  It also has a quick share feature that let’s you upload directly to YouTube, Flickr, & Facebook.

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Finding training for Revit isn’t always easy. Finding FREE training is next to impossible. So I’ve put a preliminary list of webcasts, white papers, and conferences together in hopes that this helps some of you by having it all in one place rather than searching the internet for them all the time. As always, feel free to add your own submission in the comments and I can add it to the list. Hope this helps:

Webcasts & Presentations:
Autodesk | Buildings Media Center
Avatech | On-demand Webcasts
Denver Revit Users Group | Presentations
Design.Reform | Revit Videos
David Cohn | Presentations
DGCAD Videos
Revit videos on YouTube
Will2Play

Whitepapers:
Autodesk | Building Resource Center
IES | Energy Modeling Analysis

Conferences:
Autodesk University

Tutorials, Workshops, Training:
Autodesk Revit Architecture Services & Support
Revit Technology Conference